Category Archives: Gullah/Geechee Fishing Association

Water is Life: Climate Change and Cultural Strife

Prince Goodlove provided an overview of the fighting and civil strife that was taking place in his country and how this has replaced the harmony in Nigeria because the water is gone in several places. The people of the north that no longer have water are now going south and doing hostile takeovers of lands where the water is still flowing. When he used these geographic terminologies, I again could only nod and agree because the Gullah/Geechee Nation’s onslaught that has led to people attempting to occupy the waterfronts and that has contributed to many of the extreme negative impacts on the water quality of our area has come via those from the north coming south as well. As Prince Goodlove said, “Those from the north now come south to take the land that the people of the south need to sustain themselves.” I could barely remain calm.

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Gullah/Geechee Nation Joins in Contacting President Obama about Banning Offshore Drilling

“There is a Gullah/Geechee proverb that says, ‘De wata bring we and de wata gwine tek we bak.’ We know that coastal resources are inextricably tied to the sustainability of Gullah/Geechee cultural heritage because we live in and from the sea.”

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Gullah/Geechee Nation International Music & Movement Festival™ 2017

Cum fa jayn we pun historic St. Helena Island, SC een de Gullah/Geechee Nation fa de 12th Annual “Gullah/Geechee Nation International Music & Movement Festival™”

August 4-6, 2017

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Learning and Celebrating the Sea @GullahGeechee

My spirit gets dehydrated at times no matter where I am and the ocean or at least a body of water seems to call me to it. When I get to the water, the dehydration is quenched. This week is a critical time for carefully going to the water since June 8th is World Oceans Day, this is Rip Current Awareness Week, and this is US Fishing Week.

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#GullahGeechee Stand at Hands Across the Sand

On Saturday, May 21, 2016, Oceana, Don’t Drill Lowcountry, and the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy, (SACE), hosted a Hands Across the Sand event on Folly Beach, at which members of the Gullah/Geechee Sea Island Coalition joined over a hundred others to join hands as a visual display of “drawing a line in the sand” to show support for the federal government’s recent decision to cancel plans for Atlantic offshore drilling, and also to increase awareness about the threat of seismic airgun blasting off the East Coast.

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Hands Across the Sands in the @GullahGeechee Nation

The 7th Annual Folly Beach Hands Across the Sands on Saturday. May 21st will begin with a press conference at 11:45 a.m. and will feature comments on the subject of offshore drilling from Folly Beach Mayor Tim Goodwin, Reverend Jeremy Rutledge, Queen Quet, Chieftess of the Gullah/Geechee Nation, and other community leaders.

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Engaging with Gullah/Geechee pun Hunnuh Journey

As many people make plans for the Memorial Day weekend and Sea Island summer journeys for their civic groups, family reunions, and social clubs, the Gullah/Geechee Sea Island Coalition helps them to link to authentic Gullah/Geechee culture via De Gullah Root Experience Tour and providing information on Gullah/Geechee owned and operated businesses and historic sites. Also, in the midst of all of the nationally advertised commercial festivals, they link their supporters to the events that are being held by the grassroots and traditional Gullah/Geechee people. St. Helena Island, SC in the Gullah/Geechee Nation which is one of very few Sea Islands that still have contiguous Gullah/Geechee family compounds in which Gullah/Geechee cultural heritage is lived daily. With this in mind, it comes as no surprise that St. Helena is the place wherein those visiting will be able to fully engage with native Gullah/Geechees and support them economically.

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A St. Helena Gullah/Geechee Gal Still Sailing

I thought of how the birth of the first African children in North America is said to have been from the Africans that were part of some of these early explorations to my home island that is embossed with the name Saint Helena to this day. These births are said to have taken place before the settlements in Virginia and other places. These and the Africans that were aboard many vessels of exploration during the time period that this galleon sailed are mostly faded away as if washed over by the salty waters of the ocean over all these years. Many of their stories like our ancestors bones have been buried in the waters of the Middle Passage.

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Queen Quet, Chieftess of the Gullah/Geechee Nation Continues Gullah/Geechee Healing and Continuation

St. Helena Island, SC native Queen Quet, Chieftess of the Gullah/Geechee Nation (www.QueenQuet.com) celebrated the 17th anniversary of being the first Gullah/Geechee to ever speak before the United Nations in Genevé, Switzerland on behalf of Gullah/Geechees by continuing to work to keep the culture alive. She and the Gullah/Geechee Sea Island Coalition (www.gullahgeechee.net) which she founded in 1996 in order to insure that Gullah/Geechee traditions and landownership would continue celebrated the conclusion of another successful “Gullah/Geechee Nation Volunteer Month” and invites the community to the landmark St. Helena Branch Library to events for healing the community and continue Gullah/Geechee culture.

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Coastal Cultures Conference 2016: Gwine ta de Wata: Gullah/Geechee & Sea Island Sustainability

Cum fa yeddi frum we bout Gwine ta de Wata: Gullah/Geechee & Sea Island Sustainability at de 4th Coastal Cultures Conference at de St. Helena Library!

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