Monthly Archives: February, 2016

Wilmington on Fire Has SC Premiere on St. Helena Island

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A massacre kept secret for over 100 years. Now the truth will finally be revealed in this outstanding film that has been playing to sold out houses throughout North Carolina. The Wilmington Massacre was a bloody attack on the African-American community by a heavily armed white mob with the support of the North Carolina Democratic Party on November 10, 1898 in the port city of Wilmington, North Carolina. It is considered one of the only successful examples of a coup d’├ętat in the United States that left countless numbers of African-American citizens dead and exiled from the city. This event was the spring board for the white supremacy movement and Jim Crow segregation throughout the state of North Carolina and the American South.

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Husia Radio features Queen Quet of the Gullah/Geechee Nation

Queen Quet at UNCW

Tune in to Husia Radio as they interview Queen Quet, Chieftess of the Gullah/Geechee Nation (www.QueenQuet.com) about her work on cultural continuation and how others in the world can support the efforts in the Gullah/Geechee Nation

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E Eye Pun We: Gullah/Geechee Tribute to Zora Neal Hurston’s Legacy

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Sister Zora was born on Jan. 7, 1891, in Notasulga, Alabama, Hurston and her family moved to Eatonville, Florida when she was a toddler. Eatonville is a rural community near Orlando, FL established in 1887. Zora Neale Hurston journeyed from there not only to Harlem to become a part of the era now called “The Harlem Renaissance,” but she also came to Beaufort County, SC in the Gullah/Geechee Nation and did anthropological field work which has been archived at the United States Library of Congress.

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Black History: Miseducation, Misrepresentation, and Exploitation of Gullah/Geechee

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Some stumbled upon it as they arrived on the Sea Islands for recreational activities along the beaches and through the forested areas. They wondered why the people spoke as they did and wondered how they created the crafts that they made. This “discovery” led to scores of people of African descent contributing to the misrepresentation and exploitation of the culture due to the fact that they as others of different races and cultures had been miseducated about what Gullah/Geechee culture actually is and from whence it came.

Due to the consistent influx of tourists to the Gullah/Geechee Nation, a number of “staged” engagements now take place which insure that they do not involve Gullah/Geechee that live the traditions and speak out about land issues and human rights. However, without the land, there will be no culture.

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Gullah/Geechee in Schenectady

Queen Quet in Albany

Join Queen Quet, Chieftess of the Gullah/Geechee Nation (www.QueenQuet.com) who is part of the Diverse Environmental Leaders National Speakers Bureau (DEL) in a celebration of the environment and Black History at Union College in Schenectady, NY.

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E Eye Bin Pun Gawd: De Gullah/Geechee Ooman

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Queen Quet, Chieftess of the Gullah/Geechee Nation returns to the St. Helena Branch Library for continuation of the “Gullah/Geechee Living Story” series. This special histo-musical presentation and lecture will be part of the Beaufort County Big Read of Zora Neale Hurston’s, “Their Eyes Were Watching God.” Come out and bring the family!

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Black History Lessons of a Gullah/Geechee Sea Island Scholar

Queen Quet at De Gullah/Geechee Alkebulan Archive

I have never been a person that could sit idly by and see injustices done and do nothing but watch. I am sure that is because I was born into a time when people were fighting! They were standing! They were tired of being tired! I was from a family that fought for the rights of not just themselves individually, but participated in the meetings and the boycotts while assisting in financially supporting one another. By being Gullah/Geechee land owners, they knew what it took to have to fight to hold on to what you had and they were not going to allow their legacy to be lost because someone else “thought” that they shouldn’t have it. It was never about what someone else thought! What are you thinking

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