Tag Archives: cultural heritage

Input Needed Regarding Jasper Ocean Terminal in the Gullah/Geechee Nation

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps), Charleston District (SAC) is preparing an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to assess the potential social, economic, and environmental effects associated with the construction and operation of the proposed Jasper Ocean Terminal (JOT) in Jasper County, South Carolina. In order to insure that Gullah/Geechee environmental and land rights are not left out of this assessment, Queen Quet, Chieftess of the Gullah/Geechee Nation (www.QueenQuet.com) was present for the initial hearing on this matter.

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De Conch January/February 2017 Edition

De Conch is the international ezine of the Gullah/Geechee Nation. Make sure to read online, download, and share the January/February 2017 Edition which details the coming events in the Gullah/Geechee Nation for the year. It highlights the activities that will be part of #GullahGeechee2020.

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Queen Quet Presents “Gullah/Geechee: Africa’s Seed in the Winds of the Diaspora”

Queen Quet, Chieftess of the Gullah/Geechee Nation (www.QueenQuet.com) is an award winning author. She has released five volumes of a thirty volume history series entitled “Gullah/Geechee: Africa’s Seed in the Winds of the Diaspora.” She will present from this series for “Books Sandwiched In” at the University of South Carolina-Beaufort Center for the Arts on Monday, February 6, 2017 at from Noon to 1 pm.

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Coastal Heritage Conference 2017: Sustaining Cultural Heritage as the Climate Changes

The Gullah/Geechee Sustainability Think Tank invites you to bring out the family for a day of interactive environmental engagement to protect cultural heritage. Advance registration is required and the event is FREE.

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Black Folks Land Legacy Conference in the Gullah/Geechee Nation

The “Inaugural Black Folks Land Legacy Conference” is being sponsored by the Gullah/Geechee Sea Island Coalition (www.gullahgeechee.net) in celebration of their 20th Anniversary as a part of a series of events that they are hosting for the “International Decade of People of African Descent.”

The “Black Folks Land Legacy Conference” is an interactive three day session on historic St. Helena Island, SC in the Gullah/Geechee Nation which is a predominately Gullah/Geechee owned and operated Sea Island.

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Gullah/Geechee Sea Island Coalition Celebrates 20 Years with #GullahGeechee2020!

To celebrate 20 years at the premiere advocacy organization for Gullah/Geechee people worldwide, the Gullah/Geechee Sea Island Coalition will host twenty different events as a part of #GullahGeechee2020. These events will also be part of their continued celebration and commemoration of the International Decade of People of African Descent.

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Celebrate the Holy Days in Gullah/Geechee Ways!

Cum fa jayn de @GullahGeechee famlee een sum fun and ting fa de Holy Days een Chastun and pun St. Helena Islandt!

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Queen Quet of the Gullah/Geechee Nation Keynotes at the International Hill Rice Symposium

Queen Quet, Chieftess of the Gullah/Geechee Nation will be the keynote speaker for the Inaugural Trinidad and Tobago International Hill Rice Symposium and Festival which is being hosted in commemoration of the bicentenary of the arrival of the Merikins to Trinidad. Following the War of 1812 between the United States of America, and Great Britain the arrival of this group of men and women, who are sometimes described as Black Loyalists, marked the beginning of rice cultivation in Trinidad. That tradition has continued unbroken through the past two centuries.

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Queen Quet of the Gullah/Geechee Nation Interviewed by Climate Home

Queen Quet, Chieftess of the Gullah/Geechee Nation (www.QueenQuet.com) was one of the world leaders that participated in the United Nations’ COP22 event in Marrakech, Morocco. Prior to her departure, Climate Home covered the journey and they followed up during the event.

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Continuing Gullah/Geechee African Reconnections

As we traversed the roads through the valleys and then up into the mountains, I gave thanks for the strength of the women here that I saw hauling items on their backs on the dirt roads and herding the animals. They reminded me of my mother and the elder mothers of my island and all the hard labor that they had gone through while hauling babies on their backs and baskets on their heads as some of these women were also still doing. I thought about the many early mornings that I awoke and traveled fo dayclean ta de field. I could feel myself balancing my neck as I saw other women with the baskets on their heads the way I carried mine in the fields and how I still carry them on stages now around the world and bring out our continuing African traditions from them for groups of people that still want to learn how we thrived and survived.

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