Tag Archives: agriculture

Black Women Founding Farmers

Tune in to the closing Women’s Herstory / Black Herstory Month edition of “Zooming in on Sustainability” honors the legacy of agriculture amongst Black women in honor of the work of Fannie Lou Hamer. Tune in to the 37th episode of “Zooming in on Sustainability” on Wednesday, March 31, 2021 at 3 pm EST as Queen Quet, Chieftess of the Gullah/Geechee Nation (www.QueenQuet.com) dialogues with Leah Penniman of Sol Fire Farms about Black women that founded their own farms and led agricultural and land retention movements.

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Celebrate #BlackHistoryMakers with A Growing Culture!

@GullahGeechee and African Diasporic Famlee! Cum fa jayn we fa de global African Family Reunion in celebration of #BlackHistory@agcconnect on Saturday! Bring de drum! As Queen Quet, Chieftess of the Gullah/Geechee Nation opens with de libation fa liberation!

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Supporting @GullahGeechee Owned Farms for National Farmers Market Week

With all of this Gullah/Geechee legacy that exist in and on the soil of the Sea Islands where the Black gold hands continue to harvest, I would have been remissed if I didn’t celebrate our farmers and our farmers markets this National Farmers Week. Hunnuh chillun need fa gwine ta um fa git sumting healtee fa nyam pun fa tru!

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#Juneteenth Drum Call for Justice

In observance of Juneteenth, A Growing Culture will host a daylong broadcast of The Hunger for Justice Series, celebrating Black voices and the fight for justice in the food system. The Juneteenth Broadcast will be held as a live event simulcast across AGC’s digital channels, with over a dozen presenters beginning with Queen Quet, Chieftess of the Gullah/Geechee Nation (www.QueenQuet.com).

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Corona Chronicle 3-Gullah/Geechee Seeds of Survival

While at home on the family compounds, folks are learning more about their family histories and land legacies which I pray leads to them valuing the land, family, and community even more. They are learning what their elders went through to hold onto the land and the methods that they used to survive and make it through many other storms and hardships and how in the midst of all of them they could still sing, “Trouble don’t last always.”

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Gullah/Geechee Heirs Property and the USDA

Although, Queen Quet and the Gullah/Geechee Sea Island Coalition (www.GullahGeechee.net) supported the Uniform Partition of Heirs Property Act in order to assist Gullah/Geechee and African American families with an equitable way to deal with retaining land when some family members want to sell and the introduction of heirs property into the US Farm Bill was linked to the movement of this act, Gullah/Geechees are concerned about the USDA’s current plans regarding heirs property.

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Culture on the Vine: Gullah/Geechee Muscadine

In the Gullah/Geechee Nation, the continuation of cultural traditions on the land is still a major issue.  The traditionalists have long since realized that without our land, we do not have a culture much less a home.   So, we continue to fight to maintain land ownership, combat environmental dangers, and to continue the economic empowerment of family members upon the land.

In Nesmith, which is on the western boundary of the Gullah/Geechee Nation in South Carolina, there are miles of acres of land lined out in cotton and soybeans.  Suddenly down a long dirt road, you find a vineyard in the midst of it all. 

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Gullah/Geechee: Heirs to Heirlooms

Many Gullah/Geechee heirs lost the value of their inheritance and their heirlooms over the generations because they truly were unaware of the value that lies therein.  They didn’t realize that land was not a burden because you had to pay taxes for it.  It is actually one of the greatest assets that one can possess.  An asset greater than that our ancestors had even during their enslavement on these lands that are now the Gullah/Geechee Nation is vision. 

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Gullah/Geechee Souls and Sea Island Cotton

just as the stock market does, I value Sea Island cotton. I value it because of the blood, sweat, and tears that helped nourish it at its roots here in the Gullah/Geechee Nation. 

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