Category Archives: Gullah/Geechee Land Ownership & Rights

President Obama Declares National Reconstruction Monument in Beaufort, SC

President Barak Obama declared five new United States National Monuments by using the Antiquities Act to “preserve critical chapters of our country’s history” and to “ensure that our national parks, monuments and public lands are fully reflective of our nation’s diverse history and culture.” One of these new national monuments is the multi-site “Reconstruction National Monument” in Beaufort County, SC. It will include the Brick Baptist Church and Darrah Hall which are both in the Penn Center National Landmark Historic District on St. Helena Island, SC as well as the site of the Emancipation Oak at Camp Saxton in Port Royal. All of these sites have major significance to the spiritual and land rights story of the Gullah/Geechee Nation as well as to the on-going battle for freedom and full recognition of the contributions of people of African descent to America.

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Gullah/Geechee Land & Legacy Fund

Recently, global media has published stories and shown news reports regarding the displacement of Gullah/Geechees from their homeland. This media attention caused thousands of people to request that the Gullah/Geechee Sea Island Coalition and Queen Quet, Chieftess of the Gullah/Geechee Nation create this GoFundMe Campaign so that they can support the efforts of helping the land retention amongst the Gullah/Geechee:

https://www.gofundme.com/gullahgeechee-land-legacy-fund

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Coastal Heritage Conference 2017: Sustaining Cultural Heritage as the Climate Changes

The Gullah/Geechee Sustainability Think Tank invites you to bring out the family for a day of interactive environmental engagement to protect cultural heritage. Advance registration is required and the event is FREE.

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Black Folks Land Legacy Conference in the Gullah/Geechee Nation

The “Inaugural Black Folks Land Legacy Conference” is being sponsored by the Gullah/Geechee Sea Island Coalition (www.gullahgeechee.net) in celebration of their 20th Anniversary as a part of a series of events that they are hosting for the “International Decade of People of African Descent.”

The “Black Folks Land Legacy Conference” is an interactive three day session on historic St. Helena Island, SC in the Gullah/Geechee Nation which is a predominately Gullah/Geechee owned and operated Sea Island.

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Gullah/Geechee Sea Island Coalition Celebrates 20 Years with #GullahGeechee2020!

To celebrate 20 years at the premiere advocacy organization for Gullah/Geechee people worldwide, the Gullah/Geechee Sea Island Coalition will host twenty different events as a part of #GullahGeechee2020. These events will also be part of their continued celebration and commemoration of the International Decade of People of African Descent.

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Fighting for Gullah/Geechee Land!

The Gullah/Geechee Sea Island Coalition has spent twenty years engaged in the battles to protect Gullah/Geechee land ownership and human rights. They have successfully gotten new zoning laws passed that protect Gullah/Geechee culture and assist Gullah/Geechee families with retaining their land ownership. They have successfully worked on laws to benefit heirs property owners. They have won legal cases that returned sacred grounds back over to Gullah/Geechee families and also prevented Gullah/Geechee towns from being destroyed in South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida.

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Continuing Gullah/Geechee African Reconnections

As we traversed the roads through the valleys and then up into the mountains, I gave thanks for the strength of the women here that I saw hauling items on their backs on the dirt roads and herding the animals. They reminded me of my mother and the elder mothers of my island and all the hard labor that they had gone through while hauling babies on their backs and baskets on their heads as some of these women were also still doing. I thought about the many early mornings that I awoke and traveled fo dayclean ta de field. I could feel myself balancing my neck as I saw other women with the baskets on their heads the way I carried mine in the fields and how I still carry them on stages now around the world and bring out our continuing African traditions from them for groups of people that still want to learn how we thrived and survived.

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Water is Life: Climate Change and Cultural Strife

Prince Goodlove provided an overview of the fighting and civil strife that was taking place in his country and how this has replaced the harmony in Nigeria because the water is gone in several places. The people of the north that no longer have water are now going south and doing hostile takeovers of lands where the water is still flowing. When he used these geographic terminologies, I again could only nod and agree because the Gullah/Geechee Nation’s onslaught that has led to people attempting to occupy the waterfronts and that has contributed to many of the extreme negative impacts on the water quality of our area has come via those from the north coming south as well. As Prince Goodlove said, “Those from the north now come south to take the land that the people of the south need to sustain themselves.” I could barely remain calm.

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Gullah/Geechee Action Call from COP22: Wha Hunnuh Gwine Do?

Living literally on the shores of the frontline of climate change impacts makes the immediately implementation of CULTURE IN ACTION absolutely necessary because as my mama always taught me “Time and tide wait for no man or woman!” The changes are already flowing. So, now it is a choice in which way we will be going. Disya a Gullah/Geechee Call ta Action frum COP22! Wha hunnuh chillun gwine do? The quality of life in the world is truly up to you!

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Gullah/Geechee Connections with the Global Climate Change Community @COP22

As the Secretary-General of the United Nations, Ban Ki-Moon stated:

“Today’s global challenges demand concerted global action and joint solutions.”

It is because of this reality that the Gullah/Geechee Nation’s citizens wanted to insure my ability to make this journey. Our Sea Islands and our cultural heritage of the Gullah/Geechee Nation can only be protected when the global community recognizes how we all connect to one another.

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