Tag Archives: Black beaches

A Place Fa We: Black Townships on the Gullah/Geechee Coast

Queen Quet, Chieftess of the Gullah/Geechee Nation (www.QueenQuet.com) is releasing a thirty volume series on Gullah/Geechee history, heritage, and culture entitled “Gullah/Geechee: Africa’s Seeds in the Winds of the Diaspora.”  Volume VI is entitled “A Place Fa We: Black Townships on the Gullah/Geechee Coast.”  This volume provides a brief, but comprehensive history of the incorporated townships that dot the coast of the Gullah/Geechee Nation and celebrates the visionaries that founded these areas while also examining the causes for the loss of some of them.   

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Jayn de Gullah/Geechee Famlee at Historic Skeeta Beach!

Many that made their way to James Island or Folly Beach did not and do not realize that there was a major gathering location adjacent to Sol Legare Island.  They tend to breeze right by on their way out to the Atlantic Ocean.  In an effort to insure that the world is well aware of the historic area that they are passing by, in 2015 the Mosquito Beach Business Association joined forces with the “Gullah/Geechee Sea Island Coalition” (www.GullahGeechee.net) to host an annual “Gullah/Geechee Famlee Day at Mosquito Beach” in order to bring awareness to the local and global community about the existence and history of “Mosquito Beach.”  Many enjoyed the inaugural event and vowed to support the continued restoration and preservation efforts of this Gullah/Geechee historic beach.  

On Saturday, July 29, 2017 beginning at Noon, the third annual “Gullah/Geechee Famlee Day at Mosquito Beach” will be held at Island Breeze 2225 Mosquito Beach Road Charleston, SC. 

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“Black Beach/White Beach” Brings to the Big Screen the Gullah/Geechee Nation’s “Black Pearl”

Filmmaker Ricky Kelly has put together an outstanding new documentary, “Black Beach/White Beach.” “Black Beach/White Beach” tells the historical journey of the formation of the “Black Pearl” of the Gullah/Geechee Nation during segregation and leads you up to the on-going battle to rebuild the town and its reputation.

The “Black Pearl” is the historic Atlantic Beach Township which is north of Myrtle Beach. Although Atlantic Beach did not receive incorporation from the state of South Carolina until 1966, Gullah/Geechees owned the land on the Atlantic Ocean prior to that and started to use it as a gathering place in 1934. They opened motels, restaurants, and night clubs and by 1936 pleasure boats were anchoring at the township where Black folks could come and enjoy themselves.

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